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Presentations by members

These presentations can also be viewed on our Youtube channel

John Longstaff presents his two miniature models of the paddle steamer RMS Scotia, the first as a "Cunarder" (she held the Blue Riband for five years) and the second, when no longer required for that service, as a screw driven cable laying vessel. In the paddle steamer version, the model has cut away sections showing the engines, boilers and some of the cabins, the latter fully furnished. Both the research for and construction of the models is covered here. This presentation was given to the Society of Model Shipwrights at their Zoom meeting on Friday 13th August 2021.

Ron Thornton describes the construction, fitting out, and sailing of his models of two "Chinese" junks, though neither of them are associated with China. Both have been fitted with radio control equipment. This talk was given to The Society of Model Shipwrights at their Zoom meeting on 11th June 2021.

Edward Cowan and Ian McLaughlan describe the research for and planning and construction of a model of HMS Ferret at 1:24. The original vessel was launched in 1711 and then deployed to the West Indies to suppress smuggling and piracy. The model has a framed hull and a system for attaching a false keel. The first flotation tests were successful. This talk was given to the Society of Model Shipwrights at their Zoom meeting on 11th June 2021.

Keith Smith presents his 1:48 model of the Charles Galley. This fast frigate/galley was launched in 1676 and was designed to chase and defeat the equally fast Xebecs along the Barbary coast. The model was built in Navy Board style using a stylized form of frame construction popular during the reign of the later Stuart Kings. The model is presented equipped with all its sweeps out, ready for rowing. This talk was given to the Society of Model Shipwrights at their Zoom meeting on 11th June 2021.

John Garnish explains some enhancements, in the pursuit of accuracy, to the Harold Hahn method of framing a hull, a procedure which assembles the component parts upside down on a building board. He introduces tools and accessories to measure the correct alignment of all members of the complex structure that is the skeleton of the model of a wooden seagoing vessel thus avoiding the all too often occurrence of a deformed hull.

Ron Thornton introduces his 1:60 working model of the American privateer Le Prince de Neufchatel from the War of 1812. The model is built out of polystyrene coated with epoxy resin and is equipped for sailing with radio control and a detachable fin and bulb keel .

Richard Simon presents three models: the Brig Le Curieux, the Xebec Le Requin and the Heavy Frigate L'Égyptienne, all three constructed to plans prepared by Jean Boudriot. In doing so he discusses assembly, carving, coppering and rigging. This presentation was given to The Society of Model Shipwrights, 30 April 2021

Peter Rogers describes his scale working model of a naval cutter c. 1800 and the difficulties of managing the topsail when going to windward. This presentation was given to the Society of Model Shipwrights at their meeting on 29th January 2021.

John Garnish describes how he first came across the 'Philadephia' in the Smithsonian Museum in Washington and then designed and built this outstanding diorama. This presentation was given to the February 2021 meeting of the Society of Model Shipwrights.

Ian McLaughlan explains how to use a paper model as a template to make wooden parts. This presentation was given to the February 2021 meeting of the Society of Model Shipwrights. This presentation was given to the February 2021 meeting of the Society of Model Shipwrights.

Alan Hall describes the tools and techniques required to achieve the ideal painted finish on very small model ships. This presentation was given to the February 2021 meeting of the Society of Model Shipwrights.

The importance of research before and during the construction of a model. Using the example of a Hezermeyer anti-aircraft platform on a C Class destroyer of 1944, Michael Reading emphasises the need for good plans, texts and photographs to fully understand the operation and design of a major piece of weapon equipment that is to be modelled